Category Archives: Vendors

Ship Model Okumoto – Youtube Videos

I just put up a post about the frame model kits from Ship Model Okumoto and immediately found some interesting stuff on Youtube.

Here is just one of the interesting videos showing one of the models going together by the kit designer Akira Okumoto. In this case, it’s the model of the French warship La Couronne. What I find particularly interesting, beyond the kit itself, is how he doesn’t use any kind of framing jig to build it.

He also makes cuts to the wood with a Japanese-style saw freehand, just following a line he draws on the wood. There’s no final sanding for correction. He just cuts the wood and glues it into place and that’s that.

There are several videos. Of course, he’s speaking Japanese, but most of video is just following the build. Interesting stuff!

 

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Ship Model Okumoto – New Frame-Model Kits

The Nautical Research Guild just posted some basic previews of 4 new kits from the new ship model kit manufacturer Ship Model Okumoto on ModelShipWorld.com. This is a new company in Japan that is producing a line of kits for those modelers who want to build a frame or admiralty-style model relatively quickly and easily.

Hannah by Ship Model Okumoto in 1/70 scale.

They offer four kits, the Revolutionary War schooner Hannah, the bark HMS Endeavour, the Santa Maria, and the 17th century French warship La Couronne. All are frame-style model kits with all parts laser cut for ease of assembly.

La Couronne by Ship Model Okumoto in 1/123 scale.

Construction times on these kits vary from an estimated 100 hours for the Hannah, on up to 240 hours for HMS Endeavour. These build times are far lower than what ship modelers usually have to face when building ship models. Normally, models like these have to be built from scratch or from semi-kits (like those from The Lumberyard), and can take many months to a year or more to complete.

Santa Maria by Ship Model Okumoto in 1/80 scale.

Given that these models require only enough sanding to clean up the char on the laser cutting and to bevel the frame edges, I suspect that working on these models should create a fairly limited amount of dust.

Now, don’t quote me on this, but I believe the intent of these kits is to build them as is – that they are not just the beginnings of a model to be planked over, painted, rigged, etc. You might be able to do that if you really want, but I think these are pretty well designed to be stand-alone kits.

HMS Endeavor from Ship Model Okumoto in 1/80 scale.

Of course, the kits, being from Japan, have instructions written in Japanese, but these days, phone apps like Google Translate, make that pretty much a non-issue. Plus, I understand that the instructions are well illustrated with color photos.

Check out Ship Model Okumoto here: https://ec.en.ship-model.net

Also, read over the details of each kit, as reviewed on the NRG’s Model Ship World using the links below:

Hannah, 1/70 scale

HMS Endeavour, 1/80 scale

La Couronne, 1/123 scale

Santa Maria, 1/80 scale

If I learn more about these kits, I’ll post updates. Ω

New and Bigger Longboat Kit from Model Shipways

I just saw a post on Model Ship World announcing this new kit from Model Shipways. This is basically a larger, armed version of the Chuck Passaro-designed 18th Century English Longboat kit. The original kit was a 1/4″ scale, or 1:48 scale, model that measured just under 12″ long. The new kit is produced at 1/2″ scale, or 1:24 scale.

The new kit is then just about 2′ long, which should make it an easier build for beginners. I’d add that while many people call the original kit a “beginner” kit, having built it, I would never recommend it for beginners. The only thing that might be okay for beginners in that kit was the simple rigging and the low price. However, this kit’s size should make it much easier to work on, still retaining the simple rig and relatively low price of $119.99.

The price of this kit includes the new cast metal cannons and other fittings, all basswood strips and laser-cut parts with no plywood used (still a cheap wood), and photo-etched brass decorative scroll work, rather than the printed paper ones from the smaller kit. It also boasts a full 48-page instruction booklet.


To check out the listing, click here: http://modelexpo-online.com/Model-Shipways-MS1460-18th-Century-Armed-Longboat–Laser-Cut-Wood-Metal-Photo-etched-Brass-Kit_p_3218.html

The smaller kit appears to be available still, and it still makes a nice, small display model. The new kit matches the scale of the 21ft English Pinnace kit, and should make a nice addition to any ship modeler’s collection. Ω

King Khufu’s Solar Boat – Woody Joe Kit – Model Built by Don Dressel

Several years ago, Woody Joe came out with a unique wooden model kit of the Solar Barge of Khufu, also known as Cheops, King of Egypt from 2589 B.C. to 2566 B.C. The ship was buried with King Khufu, and intended for use in the afterlife. It measures 143 feet long and is one of the most well preserved, largest and oldest vessel ever discovered.

Woody Joe produces this 1/72-scale kit, making heavy use of laser-cut wooden parts. It’s a beautifully designed kit, with the model measuring around 23″ long when complete.

It’s designed to be fairly easy to build, though of course the instructions are in Japanese. Mr. Dressel reported that he did have some difficulty interpreting some of the instructions until he downloaded the Google Translate app on his iPad.

Zootoyz, an excellent online seller featuring Woody Joe kits, lists the kit as a Level 2 kit on a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being the most difficult. Woody Joe suggests that completion of the kit should take about 25 hours, which makes it one of their quicker builds.

The kit has a list price of ¥22,000, which is around $200. And, with Zootoyz new wooden model online shop and it’s introductory discount extended through the end of June, the price comes down to $184 plus shipping.

For more information about King Khufu, see this Wikipedia entry: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khufu

Or for info specifically about the solar boat, there is this one: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khufu_ship

Mr. Dressel says he will be displaying his model at the upcoming 2018 NRG conference in Las Vegas, which is just a few months away.

Zootoyz: All Wooden Kits, Discounts, and Revamped Website

Zootoyz, which is my go-to online shop for all things Woody Joe, has created a new website dedicated to wooden model construction and is currently featuring special discount pricing in celebration.

If you’ve ever visited them before, you may recall seeing a few lines of plastic kits and some various odds-and-ends kits. While the main Zootoyz online shop still exists, to make it easier for those of us interested specifically in wooden models from Japan, they’ve created this specialized site, which you can find here: https://www.japan-wooden-model-kits-zootoyz.shop/index.html 

But something else to note besides a much more organized site, is that they are listing a couple brand new architectural kits from Woody Joes new line of models featuring places from the famous woodblock prints of Hiroshige’s 53 Station of the Tōkaidō . The new kits were only just announced by Woody Joe and are the famous Nihonbashi bridge and the Arai Sekisho, one of the many stations which regulated travel on the major roads. These are mini-kits that sell for around $40 each, plus shipping.

Note that the trees are included, but the figures and grass are not. This one has nifty little boats and a couple 2-D silhouette figures though.

Note that the trees are included, but the figures shown are not. There are, however, a few 2-D silhouette figures inside the building, checking the records of travelers.

Being small, you might as well buy more than one, as I think the shipping will be the same. Also, if  you’re getting one of the bigger kits, these mini-kits are a nice add-on to your order and they make nice quick diversions. Woody Joe lists them as 8-hour kits. So, they should make nice weekend kits.

Also, if you place an order from the new site, there’s currently an introductory sale going on through June 24th – Just remember Japan is a day ahead of us in the U.S.  So now is a good time to get your new Woody Joe kit! Ω

 

The Hayling Hoy of 1759 – New Book by David Antscherl

David Antscherl has done it again in this newest publication from Seawatch Books.

 

This newest title details the construction of an English Hoy, a harbor craft used to transport cargo and passengers. The book details the plank-on-frame construction of one of these vessels, using framing techniques from the first volume of The Fully Framed Model, a.k.a. The Swan series.

The Seawatch Books description doesn’t give many specifics about the vessel or the plans. Presumably, the plans are the same 1/4″ scale (1:48), as those in the Swan series were. Anchor hoy’s being cutter-rigged will certainly make this a smaller model in comparison with a full-rigged ship. I’m looking for more details now and will revise this post with any updates I find.

The book is a large format 8-1/2″ x 11″, 200 pages, hardcover, with 8 color pages and 3 sheets of plans, and sells for $70 plus shipping.

 

New Titles from Ancre Books

Just heard from Ancre.fr announcing their latest releases. It’s nice to see new titles, even after Mr. Hubert Berti’s passing. Of course, most of the books are non-english titles. These include a 478-page French directory of French Merchant Ships from 1848 to 1871; a couple books in Italian/French on nautical nomenclature; a book on building and maneuvering lateen rigged ships and boats – that will be nice to see in English, but is currently only in French and Italian; and a Spanish version of the monograph on the Hermione (already available in English).

The one that stands out most, is a new English language version of the monograph of the French light frigate Aurore of 1697 by Jean-Claude LEMINEUR.

This work includes 31 plates, which I assume means 31 sheets of plans, in 1/48 scale, with a price of 115 €. A 20-sheet set of plans are available separately in 1/36 scale for 90 €.

This is a beautiful looking ship, and it’s nice to see a detailed monograph on small ship of this period. Ω

 

 

New Source of Model Paints: True North Precision Enamels

Today, someone pointed out in a ship modeling newsletter that there is a new manufacturer of model paints called True North Precision Enamels. The Maine based company is making a complete line of oil based enamel paints, and It appears that BlueJacket Shipcrafters is in the works to start carrying the new brand of paints (As of this date, these don’t seem to appear on their online shop).

The color selection is a bit limited yet, but there appear to be plans to fill out a line of 5 series of colors that includes:

  • Federal Standard 595B and C Matching Colors
  • World War 2 Military Colors
  • Modern Military Colors
  • Non-Military, Automotive, Figure and Mixing Colors
  • Metal Effects

I haven’t tried the new paints out myself yet, though I just ordered a sample of colors. But, the paint series is being created by modelers (both founders are modelers) for modelers. So, this should be some good news for modelers of all kinds. Ω

Brass Nameplates from the Engraving Connection

Last week, I got my latest order of engraved brass nameplates for a couple of my completed models. I don’t recall where I’ve ordered from previously, but I thought I’d post a plug for this little shop in Plymouth, Michigan.

The shop is called the Engraving Connection and it’s apparently a little place that has a website, making it easy to order from them. I’m sure there are others you can find out there, but I’ve been very happy with the plates I’ve gotten from them, as well as their service, and I thought some readers here might appreciate the suggestion of a source for brass nameplates.

I use the nameplates I get from this shop to put on my model display bases and they cost me less than $20 each, shipped, and they usually arrive in about a week, though I’m sure that depends on how busy they are.

The plates shown above were ordered as 1″ x 3″ simple rectangular brass, but you can order other sizes, or request notched corners for something a little fancier. In the special instructions box, I asked to make the first line a little larger and opted for the default typeface, which I believe is Goudy.

The plates come with double-stick tape on the back, and I’ve never had a problem with them coming off. There are other options available if you so desire.

You can find them at http://www.engravecon.com.

Milled Wood Sheets at Syren Ship Model Company

Ever since Jeff Hayes closed the doors at Hobby Mill, sources for milled lumber for ship modelers have been a bit spotty. So, the news that Syren Ship Model Company is now selling milled sheets is very weclome in the community.

Chuck Passaro is now offering Boxwood, Swiss Pear, and Alaskan Yellow Cedar in sheets of various thicknesses. He doesn’t have every size on hand at all times, but he only lists those sizes and varieties that he does have. So, there’s no worry about not getting what you’ve ordered.

Prices range from around $4.75 to $13 per sheet, depending on thickness and wood type. The wood available is only available in sheets, so if you need strip woods, you’ll need a table saw to cut your own.

See what’s in stock here: https://www.syrenshipmodelcompany.com/milled-lumber.php