Woody Joe’s Old Sengokubune and Kitamaebune Kits Now Collectors’ Items

When the kits you want to build become “collectibles”… Such is now the case with these two kits from Japan’s wooden model kit manufacturer Woody Joe.

Wasen Modeler

Before the advent of laser cutting, Woody Joe made two bezaisen kits, the Sengokubune and the Kitamaebune. Both were described as 1/30 scale models, but were in actuality about 1/60 scale. These kits were supplied with milled wood parts, wooden sheets, strips and dowels. Construction was more what one would expect from a wooden model kit.

Woody Joe’s old Kitamaebune kit.

Woody Joe’s new 1/72-scale laser-cut Kitamaebune kit.

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Feature Kit: Artesania Latina’s French Privateer Cutter Le Renard, 1813

I’ve always like the look of the cutter rig. After building my model of the HMS Alert paper model by Shipyard, I became enamored with them. There are several kits of this type available, but this is a really nice looking, good sized model. I think Artesania Latina has come a long way in improving the scale appearance and details of their kits, while still keeping a nice, relatively low price point.

Ages of Sail

Looking for a beautiful ship model subject that’s big enough to display, easy enough to build, won’t takes years to complete, and at an affordable price? Take a look at the French privateer cutter, Le Rendard, 1813. 

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Amati Swedish Gunboat Build – Part 6

Following our meeting in October, it was clear it was time to finish up the Swedish Gunboat build. We’re down to three active builders of this model from the five that started, which isn’t too bad. One of our  builders decided to finish his up as a gift for someone, and the other is a beginning ship modeler who is anxious to get to his next project. I’m also ready to have a project actually reach completion.

Rigging and Sails

I shaped the masts and the two lugsail yards some time back. I originally added a ball to the tops of the masts as shown on the kit plans, but replaced them with a thinner pole after looking at the photos of the museum model. The presence of the pole creates a shoulder at the top of the mast, that helps secure the shrouds and stays. While modifying the masts, I also added a pair of cleats at the bottom end of each mast, again based on the photos of the museum model (see earlier posts).

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New Ancre Books Title – N.S. del Rosario Feluca 1759

I just got a notice from Ancre Books of France of a new Monograph on the Nostra Signora del Rosario, a typical sardine-fishing felucca of Sanremo, built in 1759.

The monograph, written by Franco Fissoro and translated by Francois Fougerat, is 200 pages of detailed information, with 130 of those pages are on the construction of the model. The book appears to be loaded with photos, includes 8 full-color pages, and includes 20 plates in 1/36 scale detailing the frames. The cost is 110 Euros plus shipping.

You can see more details about this new volume on Ancre’s site here: https://ancre.fr/en/monographies-en/87-ns-del-rosario-feluca-1759.html

 

Ship Model Talk in North Reading, MA

Ages of Sail just posted this announcement of ship modeler Frank Moda’s upcoming talk in North Reading, Massachusetts on Tuesday, November 14th, 2017. He’s built some very fine looking models. If you’re in the area, I highly recommend checking it out this event.

Ages of Sail

Those of you living in Massachusetts might be interested in attending a ship modeling talk given by the very talented ship modeler Frank Moda. He’ll be speaking at the Flynt Memorial Library in North Reading, MA, on Tuesday, November 14th at 7pm.

You might recall Mr. Moda’s beautiful Wasa model that we featured in a recent post (click here for the story).

Flynt Memorial Library is located at 147 Park Street in North Reading, MA. The event is free, but the library staff is requesting that those interested in attending please register for the event. You may either call them at 978-664-4942, or visit the event page on their website – Click Here

Mr. Moda will be displaying some of his works and talk about the art of ship modeling, followed by a Q & A session. Ω

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HMS Mercury Paper Model – The Build, Part 5

HMS Mercury’s Cannons

Before I can put too much of the interior detail into place, I really need to add the cannon carriages and probably the gun tackle too. The main reason is that if I am going to add any amount of gun tackle, I need some room to add ringbolts and blocks and such in the tight confines of the model’s interior. This will be more difficult if I try to do this after adding other interior furnishings.

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NRG Conference this Week in St. Petersburg, Florida

For those who weren’t aware, if you happen to be in the area of St. Petersburg, Florida this week, you should consider checking out the NRG Conference, which is being held at the Hilton St. Petersburg Bayfront hotel.

The annual conference is an international gathering of ship modelers that will take place from Thursday, October 26th through Saturday, October 28th. Local tours of interest take place on Thursday, while Technical sessions and symposiums, plus the annual membership meeting and banquet, take place on Saturday.

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Updates to the Site

For those of you who have are familiar with this site, I want to apologize for messing you up here. I’ve decided to make some changes, as I described on my Welcome page. I’ll repeat a bit of that here.

Basically, I’m looking at increasing my build log posts, but I don’t want those to overwhelm my general news posts. So, I’m trying to separate things a bit more here. That’s required me to work within the specific features of the WordPress site, requiring a bit of creative thinking in order to figure out how to make this work the way I want it. This is not so much a limitation of WordPress, which I love by the way, rather, it’s a bit of a limitation on my knowledge of the WordPress interface and software.

I think I’m getting things figured out, but things may change on you a bit if you are visiting this week. Hopefully, this won’t drive you away from the site. In the long run, I hope you’ll find the changes make sense and that you’ll be able to find what you’re looking for easily, logically.

Please feel free to send comments if you feel it’s harder to find what you’re looking for. Just used the comment box below. Mostly, I don’t publish comments unless they are general unless it’s something I feel that other people really need to read, but I often reply directly to those with questions. Ω

H.M.S. Victory, Mantua/Panart kit in 1:78 Scale – Part 3

Those of you who have seen my previous posts on this project will be happy to know I’m still on it. The last year has been a very busy one for me in the research of Japanese traditional boats, and that is the primary force that’s pulled me away from a lot of progress on HMS Victory. Well, that and the fact that there’s just a lot to the model and I have been adding details, straying from the original kit, and that’s been time consuming and a little overwhelming. But, progress is being made.

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HMS Mercury Paper Model – The Build, Part 4

The 1/96-scale HMS Mercury paper model continues. Since my last posting on the subject, I’ve been considering posting a little more regularly to the build logs on this site. I’ve traditionally posted in more regularly on major ship modeling forums and posted larger summaries here. But, for various reasons, I think it makes more sense for me to post more details here.

We’ll see how it goes. It would mean more frequent, probably shorter posts. I just don’t want to overwhelm my blog here with a lot of small posts that aren’t of particular interest to all visitors. I may have to reorganize this site a little, so that build log posts aren’t part of the main stream of posts on this site. Everything is a work in progress…

HMS Mercury’s Stove

Having some interior detail is one of the interesting aspects of these Shipyard brand kits. I don’t know if I’ll be using all of the interior furnishings, but certainly want to include the major ones, even though these will be extremely difficult to ever see inside the completed model.

I built the stove straight from the kit, with a few modifications. I don’t know how the stoves external gear functions, but there is a what looks like a chain driven mechanism, apparently for turning a spit. The chain drive was printed on paper, two gears and the connecting chain, and it was just too hard to cut out as a single piece. So, instead, I cut the gears out and then just added wire to represent the chain. I also used a heavier piece of wire for the external axle.

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