Building the Kamakura Period Umi-Bune, Part 9

Been away from ship modeling due to various issues over the past couple months. Today, I made some real progress on modeling traditional Japanese boats, or wasen. The Kamakura period trade boat is getting closer to completion. Probably a couple build log installments to go after this one…

Wasen Modeler

As if my work wasn’t coming along slowly enough, a car accident and heavier work load managed to bring my ship modeling of all types to a standstill. After nearly two months of making no progress on anything, I finally found myself in a position to move forward again on the Umibune. I didn’t managed to figure out too much regarding the making of scale figures for the model, but I did finish tying the bindings on the rails. I also decided on how I wanted to finish the aft deckhouse, or yakata.

I basically returned to the idea of installing only lower panels on the sides of the structure. There seem to be a multitude of ways that artists and model makers have interpreted this design, so I just went with something I recall seeing in a painting. Is it accurate? There really doesn’t appear to be any way to…

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Model Boats on Parade – September 16 in San Francisco

Sorry, I know this is a very last minute posting, but I was just reminded that the San Francisco Model Yacht Club is holding its annual model boat event tomorrow, Sunday, September 16, 2018, at Spreckles Lake in Golden Gate Park.

The event setup begins at 9:30am. It’s open to the public and should go on most of the day. The club will have its clubhouse open, so you can view various boats on display that aren’t out in the water. Plus, you’ll have an opportunity to see all kinds of powered RC models, some small, some VERY BIG, plus RC sailboats. There’s even a group that does free sail racing, where the boats, powered only by the wind, are pre-set to guide themselves across the lake.

Here’s the informational flyer from the SFMYC’s website:

Get set for a fun and interesting day in the park! Ω

 

Nautical Research Journal – New Digital Subscriptions!

At least one person I know wouldn’t join the NRG because he didn’t want any more paper subscriptions piling up in his house. Well, those with similar feelings will be happy to know that they can now avoid the slow mailing system and piles of journals stacking up or getting lost by signing up for a digital subscription.

Digital editions are available as either a separate, lower priced, subscription at $40/yr, as opposed to the regular print subscription included with NRG membership of $50/yr, or as an add-on to regular membership and print subscription for an additional $15/yr.

The benefits to the digital edition are many. The subscription appears to be stored on-line, and you access the editions via the web. There is a large array of tools for searching, zooming, and scrolling through your magazine. There is a drop-down table of contents, if you want to jump straight to a particular article. You can mark favorite pages and can even type in your own notes.

There are some downsides that I can see already. A minor issue is that when you are looking at the tool that lets you jump to specific pages, those page numbers don’t correspond to the Journal issue page numbers, as the Journal issues are consecutively numbered for an entire volume, or year. So, if you jump to page 40 in the Autumn issue, the current one, it’s actually Journal page 198. Certainly not a big deal.

Another point you might want to note is that you can’t print off or copy any pages. I can understand the need for copy protection, and for the Journal to put itself out on the digital scene, it’s about the only way to protect it. But, it is annoying to not be able to copy an article that you’re referencing and to store it with other research materials. For that, you’ll need the print edition.

Personally, I found navigating to be a bit funky, but that’s probably because I’m a trackpad user. Using keys to paginate and zoom are pretty easy, and I can imagine that using a mouse is also pretty straight forward.

All in all, it’s a great step forward for the NRG and the Journal. I’m not sure if I’ll migrate completely from the print edition, or maybe just add the digital edition to my membership. But, it’s certainly a good option and one that I’m sure many people will appreciate.

There is a sample issue available along with subscription details on the NRG’s website here: https://www.thenrg.org/digital-edition.php.

Ω

C.A. Thayer: The Last of the Lumber Schooners

If you’ve ever visited the San Francisco waterfront, you may have see a three masted lumber schooner at Hyde Street Pier. The C.A. Thayer was built in 1895 at the Bendixen Shipyards near Eureka, California, and is the last surviving lumber schooner.

Recently restored, a Youtube video about her was put together by the San Francisco National Historic Park. It’s posted on the Current Projects page of the San Francisco National Maritime Park Association’s website.

I’ve also posted it below, in case their page changes. It’s a wonderfully done video. Please consider visiting the Park Associations website to become a member or to make a donation to future projects and educational programs.

Ω

Seaways’ Ships in Scale Ceases Publication

Sad news for ship modelers everywhere. Seaways’ Ships in Scale has apparently ceased publication. This, according to the Nautical Research Guild, whose own Journal will be working to pick up some of the void left behind by the long time periodical. The last issue sent out was the Spring issue, 2018, which is still listed on their website, and no official announcement has been posted or been mailed out to subscribers.

If you recall, it was exactly a year ago that the publication went from bi-monthly to quarterly. To my knowledge, the issue was primarily one of time involvement of the publisher, and as recently as a month ago, they were still accepting advertising.

Speaking strictly for myself, this is sad news in that the magazine was a great way for me to get written material out to a wide audience. I’ve personally had five articles published in Ships in Scale over the years, but no more.

Still, this is an opportunity for the Nautical Research Guild to expand the Nautical Research Journal and to hopefully pick up some of those Ships in Scale subscribers to reach a larger audience.

HMS Alert Follow Up and Youtube Video

At the 2016 NRG Conference in San Diego, CA. Photo by Ryland Craze.

And, since Ages of Sail needed some kind of Youtube presence, I took my review photos, construction photos, and completed model photos, and put them together into a slide show with text transitions and some classical music.

I actually put this together about a year ago and then forgot all about it. I was looking at posting some other video recently and rediscovered it. So, here it is in all its splendor, HMS Alert from the Shipyard paper model kit, with some additions…


And, just in case you want to try building this kit yourself, here’s a link to it on Ages of Sail: https://www.agesofsail.com/ecommerce/hms-alert-1777-1:96—shipyard-mk019–paper-model-kit.html

Note that it now appears as part of two other combination sets. In this one, which included Le Coureur: https://www.agesofsail.com/ecommerce/30-anniversary-collection–the-opponents–shipyard-mkj005–paper-model.html

And this one, which includes Le Coureur as well as HMS Mercury: https://www.agesofsail.com/ecommerce/30-anniversary-collection–north-europe-part-2–shipyard-mkj003–paper-model.html

Ship Model Okumoto – Youtube Videos

I just put up a post about the frame model kits from Ship Model Okumoto and immediately found some interesting stuff on Youtube.

Here is just one of the interesting videos showing one of the models going together by the kit designer Akira Okumoto. In this case, it’s the model of the French warship La Couronne. What I find particularly interesting, beyond the kit itself, is how he doesn’t use any kind of framing jig to build it.

He also makes cuts to the wood with a Japanese-style saw freehand, just following a line he draws on the wood. There’s no final sanding for correction. He just cuts the wood and glues it into place and that’s that.

There are several videos. Of course, he’s speaking Japanese, but most of video is just following the build. Interesting stuff!

 

Ship Model Okumoto – New Frame-Model Kits

The Nautical Research Guild just posted some basic previews of 4 new kits from the new ship model kit manufacturer Ship Model Okumoto on ModelShipWorld.com. This is a new company in Japan that is producing a line of kits for those modelers who want to build a frame or admiralty-style model relatively quickly and easily.

Hannah by Ship Model Okumoto in 1/70 scale.

They offer four kits, the Revolutionary War schooner Hannah, the bark HMS Endeavour, the Santa Maria, and the 17th century French warship La Couronne. All are frame-style model kits with all parts laser cut for ease of assembly.

La Couronne by Ship Model Okumoto in 1/123 scale.

Construction times on these kits vary from an estimated 100 hours for the Hannah, on up to 240 hours for HMS Endeavour. These build times are far lower than what ship modelers usually have to face when building ship models. Normally, models like these have to be built from scratch or from semi-kits (like those from The Lumberyard), and can take many months to a year or more to complete.

Santa Maria by Ship Model Okumoto in 1/80 scale.

Given that these models require only enough sanding to clean up the char on the laser cutting and to bevel the frame edges, I suspect that working on these models should create a fairly limited amount of dust.

Now, don’t quote me on this, but I believe the intent of these kits is to build them as is – that they are not just the beginnings of a model to be planked over, painted, rigged, etc. You might be able to do that if you really want, but I think these are pretty well designed to be stand-alone kits.

HMS Endeavor from Ship Model Okumoto in 1/80 scale.

Of course, the kits, being from Japan, have instructions written in Japanese, but these days, phone apps like Google Translate, make that pretty much a non-issue. Plus, I understand that the instructions are well illustrated with color photos.

Check out Ship Model Okumoto here: https://ec.en.ship-model.net

Also, read over the details of each kit, as reviewed on the NRG’s Model Ship World using the links below:

Hannah, 1/70 scale

HMS Endeavour, 1/80 scale

La Couronne, 1/123 scale

Santa Maria, 1/80 scale

If I learn more about these kits, I’ll post updates. Ω

SLEEPING CAR of the 1929 ORIENT EXPRESS – Super Detailed Kit

Agatha Christie / Poirot fans take note!

It may not be a ship model, but this new kit from Amati looks pretty awesome. I imagine just about any modeler would enjoy taking on this 1/32-scale model of a 1930s luxury sleeping car. I’m told that this monster of a multimedia kit comes in at about 30 pounds, shipping weight!

Ages of Sail

Amati Model has outdone themselves with the release of this new kit. It is a 1/32-scale model kit of the Sleeping Car of the famed Orient Express, known for luxurious accomodations and international travel across Europe, connecting locations as far as Calais, Istanbul, and Athens.

The new Amati kit measures over 28″ in length and features multimedia construction, using high quality wood, parts of photo-etched brass and nickel-silver, highly detail metal casting, and more.

The model features a super detailed interior and a removable roof top, so you can access it all.

The kit, which will be in stock very soon, is a very high-end kit and lists for $1199, but we will have a special introductory sale price of $999.

While your waiting to purchase yours, check out this teaser video posted by Amati

As soon as our shipment of the new kit comes in, which should be in…

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Building a Gozabune (Kobaya) from Paris Plans – Part 8

The latest on Le Petit Galère from Paris’ Le Souvenirs de Marine. The major hull detail are wrapped up here as I’m getting closer to laying down some paint on the model.

Wasen Modeler

So, I drilled out the rogui on which the ro, or sculling oars, pivot. I used a sharp point to start the hole and finished up using a small drill in a Dremel rotary tool. Because I’m starting to consider painting the model, I’m going to hold off on adding the pins to the rogui until some later time.

Also, I found more structural work to complete before I have to deal with the rails, so I’m putting that assembly off for the moment.

Finishing Mortises

Today, I finished the remaining mortises. I did these the same way as the ones done earlier, laying out strips of tape to maintain even spacing, but the mortises at the todate (transom) and the miyoshi (stem), were a little smaller and slightly closer together. 

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