Building HMS Wolf – Shipyard’s 1/72 Scale Laser-Cut Card Kit – Part 3

In addition to my work on the paper Armed Virginia Sloop model from Seahorse. The build of Shipyard’s 1/72 HMS Wolf kit continues with the adding of the second hull layer. As a reminder, this kit is almost 100% laser-cut parts. There are some dowels to shape for the masts and yard later on, plus rigging. Also, cannon barrels and belaying pins are turned brass, and there are some other non-paper parts, such as the figurehead, which is cast resin. But, there are no paper parts that aren’t already pre-cut by laser, except for a small sheet of color printed decorative friezes and flags.

In my previous post, I had the hull skeleton covered by the first layer. This primarily stiffens the bulkheads and provides some support to the outer hull layers. This covering is done the same way on all ship model kits from Shipyard, whether they are printed paper models or laser-cut cardboard kits like this one.

Starting The Second Layer

The second layer is made up of strips that resemble whole bands of hull planks. In fact, this second layer is basically the same as the final layer of most of the 1/96-scale Shipyard paper model kits. But, with the laser-cut card kits, this layer is substantially thick. It’s application stiffens the hull further, and should give the third and final layer of planking a good surface to build up from.

One of the sheets carrying the second layer parts. I’ve drawn a red box around these. The parts below the box and for the third and final layer.

According to something I read recently, it’s best to apply glue only at the frames in order to avoid what some people call the “starving cow” appearance, where the hull frames show through the hull planking, so I tried the technique. It seemed to work pretty well. But, I think it also helped that the layer was fairly thick card stock.

Note that the kit has you apply these layers starting at the bottom of the bulwarks piece and working towards the keel. This worked okay, but I can’t help wondering if it would be better to start at the keel and work upwards. Any gaps or overlap would then be covered up by the wide strake at the base of the bulwarks which represents the thick planking of the wales.

The Completed Second Layer

When I got all done with this layer, the hull was definitely a lot sturdier. In the photo below, you can still see a lilttle amount of waviness, where the frames poke through a little, but it’s not very pronounced. In my experience, this should be taken care of by the time I get the third and final layer on.

The main issue I had was that the bottom edge of the bulwarks piece protruded just a little bit. But, at this stage, you can actually do a little trimming and sanding. And, by the time the last layer goes on, things like this should be pretty well evened out.

Next time, I’ll be adding the third layer, which is mostly made up of individual planks. Again, it begins at the bulwarks with a large strip, with all the planking details laser-etched into it.

 

 

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2 thoughts on “Building HMS Wolf – Shipyard’s 1/72 Scale Laser-Cut Card Kit – Part 3

  1. agesofsail

    Reblogged this on Ages of Sail and commented:
    Being that Ages of Sail is the US distributor for the products from Shipyard, the maker of very fine quality paper and card model kits, it’s always wonderful to see one of our kits go through the transformation from 2D paper pieces into a beautiful 3D model.

    Here’s the continuation of the 1/72 scale HMS Wolf laser-cut model build.

    Follow along and build your own. Check out the kit at Ages of Sail here: https://www.agesofsail.com/ecommerce/hms-wolf,-1754-1:72—shipyard-zl029-laser-cardboard-kit.html

    Reply

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