Monthly Archives: March 2019

Wasen Models at the Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival

Wasen Mokei 和船模型

The Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festivalis a big annual event up in Washington state for lovers of wooden boats, and I believe it’s one of the largest events of its type in the world. Now, I’m not personally a big wooden boat enthusiast, so I never had any intention on going, but it looks like I’ll be displaying my Japanese boat models there this Fall.

This is all coming about with the suggestion of Douglas Brooks, who will be doing a Japanese boat building workshop just prior to the festival. The organizers want to make something of an event out of the completion of the boat.

Douglas had the idea that the organizers would be interested in some Japanese boat related displays, which they are. They offered a table and to look for some accommodations for me, so it looks like I’ll be making the drive up there at…

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IPMS Show Follow-Up

The SVSM 2019 Classic was the name of the IPMS show held March 19th, 2019, at San Jose’s Napredak Hall. The South Bay Model Shipwrights and Ages of Sail had adjacent tables at the event and I was manning the Ages of Sail table for the whole day.

SBMS members James Lunt and Jacob Cohn demonstrating ship modeling skills and talking with visitors to the table.

SBMS member Jacob Cohn demonstrating his rigging skills as he adds ratlines to his 3/16″ scale HMS Sultana model.

It was definitely a long day for me, but I sold a lot of tools, a couple kits, and got to talk with a lot of existing and potential customers. Continue reading

HMS Beagle Pre-Orders Now Being Accepted with Discount

Ages of Sail

They’re on their way!

OcCre just informed us that the HMS Beagle kits have officially been released. We have a large shipment now on its way and they should be here within the next two weeks. To minimize your wait time for this exciting new kit release, we’re now accepting pre-orders.

Pre-Order Now, and we’ll send your order as soon as the kits arrive. What’s more, we’re discounting the kit by 10% off its retail price of $209, making it an even greater value than it already is, at $188.10.

CLICK HERE to PRE-ORDER NOW!

HMS Beagle became famous for her survey voyages when a passenger on her second expedition, a young naturalist named Charles Darwin, wrote his famous work On the Origin of Species.

The ship was built as one of the Cherokee-class of 10-gun brig sloops, and was launched in the Thames River on May 11, 1820…

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North West Short Line to Close

Those of you who have been building models long enough should recognize this company. While they’re primarily in the railroad model aftermarket business, they make a few products that many ship modelers have used including the well-known ‘Chopper’ products. The owner recently announced that for personal reasons, the company will cease operations on August 30, 2019.

There is always the chance that someone out there will buy the company. But with the kind of products including gear pullers, arbor press, detail sander, brass bending press, and specialty tools for railroad models, it would take someone with skill and knowhow to keep the product line going.

Of course, we’ll see second hand products on Ebay and at our local ship modeling clubs for quite some time. But, it is always sad to see a hobby industry fixture like NWSL go.

For now, the company is still in operation, so if you are looking for some unique tools, check out their website: http://www.nwsl.com. Ω

 

HMS Terror Kits – Back in Stock, Price Increase, Special Discount

Ages of Sail has more of this historic ship model kit in stock. And, since OcCre’s upcoming HMS Beagle kit is still in the “upcoming” stage and not yet available, I broke down and got one.

Yeah, I was picking up some stuff at the Ages of Sail shop to take over to the IPMS show I’m working at tomorrow, and I just couldn’t help myself. I know, I have enough stuff to work on, but now that I have this kit in hand, I’m actually more excited about it than before.

I really think this is going to be a particularly interesting build, and I’ve started perusing Matthew Betts’s blog site and thinking about modifications I’m going to want to make to the kit. Not only that, but I started re-watching the AMC series The Terror.

If you’re considering buying a ship model kit, you should really check out this one. It seems to be a very good value.

Ages of Sail

OcCre’s wooden model kit of the arctic exploration ship HMS Terror is back in stock at Ages of Sail!

Click Here to Buy Your HMS Terror Kit

The bad news is that the manufacturer increased the price of the kit, so our full retail price is now $209. However, the good news is that this is still an incredible value for a kit of this quality and detail. Also, to help out, we’re offering a special limited time pricing of only $188.10.

Click Here to Buy Your HMS Terror Kit

The real ship and the Franklin Expedition of which Terror was a part is the subject of the AMC series The Terror. Need some inspiration? Check out these Youtube clips:

The 1/65-scale kit is based on the research and drawings developed by ship modeler Mathew Betts. You can read about his work, as well as his involvement in the TV…

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New Bedford Whaleboat by Tom Shea

This view of Tom Shea’s recently completed Whaleboat model was just posted on the Hyde Street Pier Model Shipwrights website. This is a really nicely done model I got to see in person last month.

Hyde Street Pier Model Shipwrights

Hyde Street Pier Model Shipwrights member Tom Shea brought in his completed New Bedford Whaleboat model at our meeting last month. Tom completed the model last year, but realized he hadn’t brought it in to a meeting in its completed form.

There were some 60,000 of these boats built by for the American whaling industry. They were sturdy boats, but put to very hard use and had life spans of not much more than three years. Today, maybe two dozen survive in maritime museums.

Tom’s is a 1/16 scale model based on a kit from Model Shipways. The kit is an excellent one, featuring plans and instruction book developed by Erik A. R. Ronnberg, Jr. Tom constructed a special stand that the boat sits upon and displays the all the boats oars, which are each sized differently depending on the rower’s position in the boat.

One of the most difficult…

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Building the Kanrin Maru – Japan’s First Screw Steamer – Part 2

Planking the hull of the Kanrin Maru is pretty easy. The ship has a sharp bow and the run of the planks is easy, needing little bending. You might be tempted to taper the planks at the bow, but that’s not what the instructions have you do. And, if you do, you may very well run out of planking material. If you want to more authentic planking, you’ll need to supply your own additional planking material.

I chose to build the hull straight from the kit at this point, so I simply laid the planks as is, starting at the bulwarks and working towards the keel. Hinoki, or Japanese cedar, is the material used for much of the kit, and it’s a bit brittle when dry. To bend or twist planks, the wood doesn’t need to be soaked, just wet. But little bending or twisting is required for this model.

As the model is intended for painting, the planks stop abruptly at the stern bulkhead. Here, the stern shape is provided in the form of a stack of thick pieces that have to be filed down to shape.

Continue reading

Building a Beginning Billing Boats Kit, Dana Fishing Boat – Part 8: More Details

Stern Platform

The stern platform is a plywood piece that fits against the bulwarks behind the tiller. Being that this is a fishing boat and that this platform is to be covered with thin wooden slats, I presume that this was used for the process of bringing aboard fishing nets. The wooden slats would allow the fisherman to stand on the platform as water drains into the channels between the slats.

The platform is a pre-cut piece of plywood, but attaching the platform is a bit problematic, as there are no grooves or anything that supports the platform. It’s supposed to be attached to the bulwarks by a simple glue joint.

Since the platform is supposed to be painted white and the wooden slats or battens are to be left a natural wood color, based on the model photos on the box and in the instruction booklet, it seemed to make the most sense to paint the platform before adding the slats. I did this before gluing the platform into place, leaving the addition of the wooden slats to be dealt with later.

Having glued the platform into place myself, I strongly advise placing a small wooden block under the platform. This can be temporarily placed or glued to the underside of the platform. In any case, trim it or sand it until the platform sits at a height and angle that will allow it to fit nicely against the stern. If this is glued on, you can probably just leave it as is or paint it a dark color, so it’s not noticeable under the platform. Another option is to add stanchions under the platform, which might be more correct.

In any case, I added mine using a technique that my old high school math teacher would refer to as “brute strength and awkwardness,” just using some tape and holding the part until the glue set. The process made enough of a mess that I had to do some paint touchup, but it worked out.

Adding the wooden slats wasn’t that hard. I simply used some contact cement, which will hold well enough given that these parts aren’t under any physical strain. I’m thinking I should touch each one also with a tiny drop of CA to lock them into place. Gluing on the painted surface of the platform isn’t ideal, but the paint is well bonded to the wood platform, and I think the glue will hold to the paint well enough.

Ideally, the wooden slats should be a lot closer together, but this is about as good as I could get given the amount of wood remaining. The biggest problem for the kit modeler here is that I’ve never seen wood of this dimension on sale from Billing Boats or elsewhere. Continue reading